People often ask why I wanted to train as a midwife and as cliché as it may sound; I believe it was a calling. I wanted to give women their choice and voice back and be the person to safely facilitate their birth wishes and choices.  I often hear, “you empower women”, however I believe women are already empowered, they may just need a little reminder of how incredible they are!

During the past 18 months I’ve had the privilege of offering those things, and for all the families and women who have been in my care, I always thank them for allowing me to be apart of their journey into motherhood.

They welcome me into their sacred family space and allow me to care for them at such a vulnerable and life-changing moment.

During those hours, I forget my own troubles and put everything I have into loving them. The women then and the women who are yet to follow, I’ll always thank them. 

Third year is on the horizon and I feel I’m able to give a realistic rundown of what studying midwifery is like, as with the highs, naturally come the lows. People are quick to shout about their successes, but not so much about their struggles, and if there’s one thing I’m passionate about in life, that’s keeping it real.

Second year has been daunting at times, as the expectation of students is higher; however I’ve found anyone is capable of anything they put their minds to. During second year pieces of the midwifery puzzle really start to come together. We have such an awesome community here on social media, so utilising it is helpful, because there are lots of us in the same boat and feeling the same feels. It’s easy to feel isolated at times with other students talking about what competencies they’ve had signed off and how many “deliveries” they have, but it’s important to remember not to compare your victories with others, as we all learn differently and will all achieve what we need to in time for qualification!

Academically it’s challenging and placement can be tough too, especially working alongside different mentors and adapting to how each midwife works. I’ve learnt what kind of midwife I want to be and also seen practice I wouldn’t necessarily implement in my own, but hey, that’s what this rollercoaster journey is all about!

I spent almost four weeks on a midwifery led unit and was completely in my element. During one shift and within the space of 6 hours I’d witnessed two physiological third stages! The promotion of normality and home from home vibe was incredibly inspiring, which was a surprise because at the beginning of my training, I thought the adrenaline filled bright lights of delivery suite and theatre would be where my passion was fuelled. In the future, post qualification and preceptorship, a midwifery led unit would be where I’d like to gain more experience. 

If you have just started your training, or are also living life as a student midwife, I can pretty much guarantee you’ll cry a lot of happy and sad tears, experience self-doubt and feel miles outside of your comfort zone.

BUT, I can also guarantee, you’ll feel appreciated, feel a ridiculous amount of pride, meet people who’ll change your whole outlook on life, you’ll figure out that you are tougher than you thought you’d ever be and help beautiful little humans into this world. 

What job can be as fulfilling than that of a midwife? 

All the love 

Alethea (mumma.to.midwife)